CHILDREN’S DAY SPECIAL

Google India struck a melodious note on Children's Day with its homepage doodle displaying a collection of Indian musical instruments – sketched by seven-year-old Ms Varsha Gupta. This is the third ‘made in India' doodle and is the winning entry for this year's ‘Doodle4Google' competition.

Musical heritage

The colourful and eye-catching doodle – based on the theme ‘India's gift to the world' – depicts a shehnai, tabla and veena amongst other instruments. A tribute to the country's musical heritage, the doodle was chosen from over 1.5 lakh entries submitted by students from across the country.

Explaining her doodle, the third-grader from Ryan International School, Greater Noida, said, “India has given many musical instruments to the world. Goddess Saraswati plays veena, God Shiva plays damaru. According to our mythological stories, musical instruments used to be played on all the occasions.”

The young doodler walks away with a technology starter package including a laptop, a year's internet connection and a Rs 2 lakh technology grant for her school.

The ‘Doodle4Google' competition was open to all students from 1st-10th standard. The doodles were shortlisted by partner art schools from across the country, after which 6,000 doodles entered the quarter-final round. Faculty from the Sir JJ School of Arts then shortlisted the 600 doodles that made it to the semi-finals. A panel of judges that included Mr Prasoon Joshi (advertising guru), Nandita Das (film actor) and Ms Ganga Kadakia (renowned artist) picked out 45 finalists.

Besides the national winner, three group winners were also chosen.

Doodles are creative Google logos that appear on some special days, to commemorate scientific and artistic achievements, historic or seasonal events, and other local occasions. Their designs also often tell netizens something new about a day, event or occasion.

Other doodles

Last month, the Google homepage featured six colourful and interactive muppets, a tribute to muppet creator, director and producer, late Jim Henson. In the past, other memorable doodles have been tributes to Charlie Chaplin, Martha Graham and John Lennon. But the biggest hit to date was one that marked 30 years of Pac-Man. Another eye-ball grabber was a playable doodle in honour of legendary electric-guitar inventor Les Paul that allowed users to strum an online guitar, and even record and replay the notes

moumita@thehindu.co.in

(This article was published on November 14, 2011)
XThese are links to The Hindu Business Line suggested by Outbrain, which may or may not be relevant to the other content on this page. You can read Outbrain's privacy and cookie policy here.