The men’s 100m at this Olympic Games has deservedly attracted more interest than all other track and field events and will be beamed live to hundreds of millions of viewers.

The attraction in large part comes down to the role played in the resurgence of athletics on a global level by Jamaica’s Usain Bolt, who won treble gold at the Beijing Games, notably the 100m and 200m, in then-world record times.

Athletics officials, fans and sponsors alike immediately took to Bolt’s ebullient, fun-loving character and obvious ability on the track, catapulting him to stardom as one of the most marketable personalities on the planet and lending the sport a massive boost in terms of public awareness.

The 100m here not only sees Bolt bidding to replicate his achievements in Beijing, but also the rise of tyro Yohan Blake alongside a strong US team seeking to reclaim the sprinting mantle long held by Americans.

“I’m always ready,” said Bolt. “It’s all about championships. I’ve had slight problems, but I’m ready to go.”

Fitness concerns, an early morning car crash and losing both the 100m and 200m to training partner and compatriot Blake at the Jamaican Olympic trials raised serious doubts about Bolt’s ability to defend his titles.

But Bolt said: “I’m going to focus on going out there to win.

“My back was a little stiff and it affected my hamstring but I’m over that. I’ve been training for the past two-and-a-half weeks and everything is all right.”

Blake has been tipped as a natural successor to Bolt since his victories in the trials, but the 22-year-old insisted he was focused not on Bolt or other runners, but solely on running his own race.

(This article was published on August 3, 2012)
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