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Narendar Pani is Professor, School of Social Sciences, National Institute of Advanced Studies, and Adjunct Faculty at the Indian Institute of Science, both at Bangalore. An economist by training, he has worked in both academic and media institutions, including Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore and The Economic Times. He has, over the last three decades, written extensively on a variety of subjects. His books include Inclusive Economics: Gandhian Method and Contemporary Policy (Sage 2001). He has also published a number of academic articles in India and abroad. He won the Citibank Pan Asia Journalism Award for 1992.

A city undone by a strange idea

Bangalore has been strangled by the government’s attempts to force it to grow in all directions »

By the rivers of Telangana

As in the Cauvery basin, we could see a conflict over sharing of Krishna waters after the creation of Telangana. »

Innovation, to what end?

Technology development seems to occur in a capsule, isolated from markets and society. »

The growing town-city divide

The cost of real estate in cities keeps out rural workforce and manufacturing capital. Why not develop towns? »

Why a falling rupee hurts

A falling rupee has discouraged FDI and increased our dependence on fickle FII flows. Our exports are not quality-driven. »

The special allure of gold

Gold meets the ordinary Indians’ need for a long-term store of value, better than bank deposits or mutual funds. »

Why India is a high-cost economy

The Economic Survey or Budget will hardly admit that processes unleashed by reforms have driven up the cost of production for the small entrepreneur. »

India too expensive for business

As Finance Minister Chidambaram prepares to present his Budget, the UPA will be hoping he recreates the magic of his ‘Dream Budget’ of 1997. That exercise may have finally fallen far sho... »

The political economy of rape

A link needs to be drawn between rising crimes against women and the crisis in agriculture. »

Why our cities are so chaotic

Metros are growing faster at the periphery than the centre. But the periphery has been left to the mercies of real estate developers. »
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