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Mr Vasan Sampath, V-P, Operations, Lister Technologies (P) Ltd; Meenakshi Sundararajan School of Management

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Success mantra: Mr Vasan Sampath (left), Vice-President – Operations, Lister Technologies (P) Ltd, at a BL Club event organised at the Meenakshi Sundararajan School of Management. To his right is Mr V.S. Vikram, Director of the institution.
Success mantra: Mr Vasan Sampath (left), Vice-President – Operations, Lister Technologies (P) Ltd, at a BL Club event organised at the Meenakshi Sundararajan School of Management. To his right is Mr V.S. Vikram, Director of the institution.

Our Bureau

Chennai, March 10 “Success is not what you achieve; success is what you go through,” said Mr Vasan Sampath, Vice-President – Operations, Lister Technologies (P) Ltd, while addressing students of the Meenakshi Sundararajan School of Management at a BL Club event presented by Indian Overseas Bank.

The current downturn has forced a few changes at the corporate level and the individual front. While companies are analysing where they are headed and are cutting down on extra costs, at the individual level, there are few jobs in the market and students are not able to bargain for higher pay packages. The expectations of those who are in employment has also risen.

The key to success lies in raising the bar and performing better than the the rest of the candidates.

Generally, the effort put in during the initial stages is high and the learning curve steep. As time moves on, some people get bored and fall by the wayside. Only the talented keep themselves motivated to attain their goals.

While talent and IQ are generally considered essential ingredients for success, time and personal effort are also very essential for success. Much admired people like Bill Gates and Roger Federer, irrespective of their talent, have put in great effort and spent many hours honing their talent.

Research has shown that Chinese children from families that work in paddy fields did better on Maths tests as compared to other children.

According to the study, these farmers work nearly 12 hours each day and this external background of hard labour could be correlated to the exceptional performance of their kids.

In short, talent, timing (the external environment to an extent) and most importantly the effort put in are the underlying factors for a person’s success.

No instant success

He added that he did not subscribe to the ‘don’t work hard, work smart’ principle. To do something good you need to spend time on it. There was nothing called instant success, he said.

Mr V.S. Vikram, Director of the institution, said getting a first-class degree was just 25 per cent of the MBA degree; the remaining education had to be gained from external sources such as newspapers, by listening to corporate personalities and other sources.

Mr John, Head of the Department, was present at the event.

(This article was published in the Business Line print edition dated March 11, 2009)
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