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Be globally competitive, students urged

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PEPPING UP: Mr R. Shekar, Executive Vice-President, Polaris, delivering a BL Club lecture at the Sathyabama Deemed University in Chennai.
PEPPING UP: Mr R. Shekar, Executive Vice-President, Polaris, delivering a BL Club lecture at the Sathyabama Deemed University in Chennai.

Our Bureau

Chennai, Sept. 18

Indians work but not hard enough. Koreans, Chinese and Sri Lankan Tamils work harder. In addition, most of the Indian workers are not disciplined, so how can I give mission-critical jobs to them, said Mr R. Shekar, Executive Vice-President (Corporate Strategy and Business Excellence), Polaris, during the course of a `Business Line Club' lecture to the management graduates of the Sathyabama Deemed University. Are you a globally competitive manager (GCM), he asked. A GCM is one who possesses global communication skills, is disciplined and hungers to achieve the greater things in life. The world will not come to you as it is - it is unprotected and all paths are risky. Learn to lace theory with practice. The more you explore the world, the better it is for you, said Mr Shekar.

Saying his career goal was to discover himself through professional challenges, Mr Shekar added that the vital career encounters are `Get Real, Get Practical, Get Really Ahead.'

A professional would encounter these ten situations: Getting a job which would involve face-to-face and tele-interviews; asking for a promotion/raise; selling an idea to the team and the boss; giving and gaining respect and confidence; striking a deal with clients for business; delegating authority and demanding responsibility; gathering competitive intelligence; conducting internal reviews; building professional net worth, and transforming self and others.

Your boss understands only one thing results. Sweat in peace today so that you do not bleed in war tomorrow, Mr Shekar advised. He emphasised the importance of role-play to overcome encounters as it helps in mimicking reality.

"I do not want yesterday-oriented knowledge for the tomorrow-oriented market. Some read 1990s books while you would be working for the 2010 market. So you need to study for the 2010 market today," Mr Shekar said.

(This article was published in the Business Line print edition dated September 19, 2006)
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