SEARCH

Guidelines to classify, segregate e-waste mooted

print   ·  

CII proposes recycling unit in Chennai

THE CHAIRMAN of the Tamil Nadu Pollution Control Board, Mr K.A. Mathew (right), with the Central Pollution Control Board Zonal Officer, Dr Sharma, at a workshop on `E -Waste Management' in Chennai on Tuesday. Shaju John
THE CHAIRMAN of the Tamil Nadu Pollution Control Board, Mr K.A. Mathew (right), with the Central Pollution Control Board Zonal Officer, Dr Sharma, at a workshop on `E -Waste Management' in Chennai on Tuesday. Shaju John

Our Bureau

A presentation by the Confederation of Indian Industry explored business opportunities in e-waste recycling.

Chennai, July 25

The need for guidelines to classify, segregate and process electronic waste (e-waste) on the lines of biomedical waste wasdiscussed at a seminar here today.

The seminar was organised by the Tamil Nadu Pollution Control Board (TNPCB).

There was stress on recyclers to register with pollution control boards so as to regulate e-waste.

This would aid in quantifying the extent of e-waste, felt authorities from the TNPCB.

The seminar threw light on the opportunity in metals recovery with presentations from e-waste recycling firms like Trishyiraya Recycling India and e-Parisaara.

Business Opportunities

Ways to implement the waste electrical and electronics equipment (WEEE) directives, restriction of use of hazardous substances (RoHS) norms and finding alternatives to hazardous substances were discussed.

A presentation by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) explored business opportunities in e-waste recycling. The world market for e-waste has been growing at 8.8 per cent and it is expected to touch Rs 49,500 crore ($ 11 billion) by 2009, from the present Rs 32,400 crore ($7.2 billion). Manufacturers were asked to buyback their products or set a recycling fund to aid e-waste management.

Extra payment

It was suggested that consumers pay a little extra for their purchases to contribute to recycling.

Consequently, recycled products should be marketed the right way, said the presentation.

The CII is working towards setting up an e-waste recycling unit in Chennai.

Obsolete items

E-waste consists of obsolete electronic and electrical items, the major ones being computers, mobile phones and refrigerators.

Most electronics items contain poisonous chemicals like lead, mercury and cadmium.

(This article was published in the Business Line print edition dated July 26, 2006)
XThese are links to The Hindu Business Line suggested by Outbrain, which may or may not be relevant to the other content on this page. You can read Outbrain's privacy and cookie policy here.

O
P
E
N

close

Recent Article in INFO-TECH

Increase in data usage propels Airtel’s profit to 3-year high

Data revenue surges 74% during the second quarter »

Comments to: web.businessline@thehindu.co.in. Copyright © 2014, The Hindu Business Line.