Queensland plans to develop and commercialise UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) for civilian use, including coastal surveillance, precision farming, power line inspection and remote sensing.

Our Bureau

Bangalore, Feb. 12

A 15-MEMBER aviation trade mission from Queensland is coming to call on Bangalore's aerospace industry next week to explore collaboration opportunities.

Queensland is the hub of Australia's aviation and aerospace industry. Under a pro-active aviation strategy, the Government of that State is actively scouting for new investments in that State and also business opportunities for its aviation companies. Its schools have introduced aerospace studies to meet the growing demand for skills in the sector, according to the Bangalore Chamber of Industries & Commerce, which is co-hosting the visit on February 15.

The team will also interact with the Society of Indian Aerospace Technologists and Industries, another co-host of the mission. Companies covering areas of aviation training, maintenance and manufacturing will visit related companies in Bangalore.

A host of global aviation majors have their Australian and Asia-Pacific base in Queensland and are looking at expanding the reach for their services. Among them are Alteon Training Australia Pty Ltd, Australian Aerospace, which is a division of EADS Eurocopter; Australian Airlines Ltd; Boeing Australia Ltd; Frequentis Australasia Pty Ltd; Helitech; Pratt and Whitney Canada (Australasia) Pty Ltd; Qantas Heavy Maintenance; Raytheon Australia; Singapore Flying College Pty Ltd; Smiths Aerospace and Virgin Blue Airlines Pty Ltd.

Queensland plans to develop and commercialise UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) for civilian use, including coastal surveillance, precision farming, power line inspection and remote sensing. The R&D programme will be taken up by the Australian Research Centre for Aerospace Automation proposed at Brisbane, which recently got some of its Australian funding support.

The two teams will also discuss common problems facing the aviation sector globally: these range from dearth of pilots and supporting engineers trained in air traffic control and management, airport design and management and operations, airline operation, aircraft maintenance engineering to airworthiness certification, avionics, quality assurance and ICAO regulations.

(This article was published in the Business Line print edition dated February 13, 2006)
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