Tyranny in the post-truth universe

Look no further: Victor Klemperer, the historian of Nazi Germany, has observed that there are four modes through which truth dies and a post-truth world emerges

Look no further: Victor Klemperer, the historian of Nazi Germany, has observed that there are four modes through which truth dies and a post-truth world emerges   -  The Hindu Archives

The 20th century holds plenty of lessons on how to pre-empt despotism. There is one that may be beyond our control

“History does not repeat, but it does instruct.”

These are the opening words of Timothy Snyder’s book On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century. Snyder argues that we must not take democracy for granted. (The book was triggered by the rise of Donald Trump in the US, but applies equally to us in India.) “The European history of the twentieth century,” he writes, “shows us that societies can break, democracies can fall, ethics can collapse, and ordinary men can find themselves standing over death pits with guns in their hands. ”

Everywhere you look, perhaps in human nature itself, tyranny lurks. By understanding how it arises, we can pre-empt it. Snyder offers ‘twenty lessons from the twentieth century,’ and I read them with a deep sense of familiarity. All the lessons of the book apply to us, though in one important way, tyranny in the 21st century might actually end up being worse. I shall get to that, but first, here are some of the lessons.

Lesson number one: “Do not obey in advance”. In authoritarian times, writes Snyder, “individuals think about what a more repressive government will want, and then offer themselves without being asked. A citizen who adapts in this way is teaching power what it can do.”

This reminds me of what LK Advani asked a group of editors after the Emergency of 1975: “You were all asked to bend — but why on earth did all of you crawl?”

Lesson number two: “Defend institutions”. Both in the US and in India, we take refuge in the institutions that are meant to safeguard us. But who will safeguard the institutions? “Institutions do not protect themselves,” writes Snyder. “They fall one after the other unless each is defended from the beginning.” He adds that one common mistake is “to assume that rulers who came to power through institutions cannot change or destroy those very institutions — even when that is exactly what they have announced they will do.”

Consider, as a parallel, what the Narendra Modi government is doing to our institutions, right from co-opting the RBI as a wing of the finance ministry, to using the CBI to carry out raids on political enemies. A friend in government recently told me, “We own the Supreme Court.” Indeed, institutional capture is central to the agenda of this government.

Lesson number three: “Beware the one-party State.” Lesson number six: “Beware of paramilitaries”. Lesson number 17: “Listen for dangerous words”. Lesson number 19: “Be a patriot” (as opposed to a nationalist). All of the lessons are pertinent, but the one that struck me the most was Lesson number 10: “Believe in truth”.

“To abandon facts is to abandon freedom,” writes Snyder. “If nothing is true, then no one can criticise power, because there is no basis upon which to do so. If nothing is true, then all is spectacle. The biggest wallet pays for the most blinding lights.”

Snyder cites the historian of Nazi Germany, Victor Klemperer, to describe the four modes through which truth dies and a post-truth world emerges. The first mode is “the open hostility to verifiable reality, which takes the form of presenting inventions and lies as if they were facts.” Snyder talks of the study that found that during the 2016 US presidential elections, “78 per cent of [Trump’s] factual claims were false.” BWF ( Bhakt Whatsapp Factories) probably achieve a higher percentage, but beyond the fake news sweatshops, there is much untruth in government spin as well — for example, during demonetisation.

The second mode is “shamanistic incantation”. Klemperer spoke of the “endless repetition” that served, in Snyder’s words, “to make the fictional plausible and the criminal desirable”. The constant painting of all political opponents as anti-national by default is an example of this, as are the false binaries that are employed. If you don’t support Modi, then you believe that “ Bharat ke tukde honge”.

The third mode is “magical thinking, or the open embrace of contradiction”. Modi embodies this, by doing the precise opposite of what he had promised in the run-up to 2014. He had promised “Minimum Government, Maximum Governance”, but what he is serving up is “Maximum Government, Minimum Governance”. On economics, Modi’s government, in its expansion of State power and disregard for individual rights, is to the left of Nehru. In both his authoritarianism and his dangerous economics, Modi is a true heir to Indira Gandhi. And yet, his followers keep seeing him as a break from the past.

The fourth mode is “misplaced faith”. As Snyder sums up Klemperer’s insight about the Nazis, “Once truth had become oracular rather than factual, evidence was irrelevant.” Much as I deplore labels and pejoratives, there is some logic to referring to Modi’s followers as bhakts.

“Post-truth is pre-fascism,” Snyder writes, but there is one important way in which this age of post-truth might be a permanent one. We live in a time of social media, which I believe to be a huge net-positive, but it does have this one bad effect of enabling echo chambers and alternative realities. Back in the day, we got our information from mainstream media, and even if there were ideological biases, there was at least a consensus on facts. Those gatekeepers are irrelevant now.

We can now believe whatever we want to, and cocoon ourselves in like-minded groups, often very large, that confirm our biases and world-views. This leads to self-reinforcing loops that then polarises discourse. We each just live in our own version of the world, and the real world doesn’t matter anymore. It’s 1.3 billion reality shows.

This is scary, and I don’t know how we will ever come out of it.

Amit Varma is a novelist. He blogs at indiauncut.com; @amitvarma

Published on June 09, 2017
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