Companies

Ranbaxy gets nod to sell new malaria drug

Our Bureau New Delhi | Updated on March 12, 2018 Published on October 21, 2013

Ranbaxy is working to make this new treatment available in African, Asian and South American markets where malaria is rampant.

Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd has received an approval from the Central Drugs Standard Control Organisation to manufacture and market a new drug for the treatment of malaria in adults.

This drug Synriam is used for treating uncomplicated malaria in adults caused by Plasmodium vivax parasite.

“Phase-III clinical trials for the drug conducted in India, successfully demonstrated the efficacy and tolerability of Synriam as comparable to chloroquine,” a statement by the company said.

Last year on April 25, Ranbaxy had launched Synriam for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria caused by a different parasite — Plasmodium falciparum.

“Since its launch, Synriam has successfully treated around one million patients,” the company said.

Ranbaxy also said it has received permission to conduct phase-III clinical trials for the paediatric formulation to be used to treat malaria.

Arun Sawhney, Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director, said: “This approval makes Synriam one of the few therapies in the world that treats both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria.”

The company said it is working towards making this drug, which has a cure rate of over 95 per cent, available in Africa, Asia and South American markets where malaria is rampant.

According to the World Malaria Report 2012 published by the World Health Organisation (WHO), India sees about 1.3 million cases of malaria each year.

Of these, about 50 per cent are caused by Plasmodium vivax, the second most important species after Plasmodium falciparum.

Worldwide, 40 per cent of all malarias are caused by Plasmodium vivax.

Ranbaxy said that this medicine gains importance in view of the fact that many traditional drugs are proving ineffective against the malarial parasite which has become resistant to such drugs.

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Published on October 21, 2013
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