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CIAL installs ₹36-crore runway lighting system

Our Bureau Kochi | Updated on July 03, 2020 Published on July 03, 2020

A file photo of international terminal at Cochin International Airport, Nedumbassery,   -  The Hindu

CAT-III lighting system will provide near-perfect alignment guidance for the operating pilot

Cochin International Airport Ltd has set up a newly-upgraded Aeronautical Ground Lighting system that enhances the visual acuity and provides near-perfect alignment guidance for the operating pilot during final approach and landing, especially in adverse weather conditions.

The ₹36-crore CAT-III lighting system at Kochi becomes the second airport in South India after Bengaluru International Airport to operate with the most advanced Aeronautical Ground Lighting system.

CIAL had commenced the runway re-surfacing project in November 2019 and completed it in April 2020. The upgradation of the CAT I AGL to CAT III level has been implemented, along with the runway renovation project, with the sole aim of improving aerodrome safety and efficiency.

The AGL upgradation project will provide bidirectional inset lights, along the central line of the runway, with a spacing of 15 metres in place of the earlier 30 metres, touchdown zone lights up to 900 metres of the runway and approach lights upgraded with additional approach side-row lights.

The entire lighting on taxiways and aprons has also been upgraded. The enhanced AGL system is powered via state-of-the-art constant current regulators with computer-based monitoring from a centralised control room.

CIAL’s engineering wing, which carried out the project has laid close to three lakh metres of cabling with 18,000 metres of trenching, and installed 2,000 new lights.

Tarmat Ltd and Honeywell Automation Ltd were the contractors for the project.

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Published on July 03, 2020
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