World

Shinzo Abe triggers snap election amid N Korea crisis

PTI Tokyo | Updated on January 10, 2018 Published on September 25, 2017

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. File Photo   -  Reuters

Paves way for a snap election for the lower house.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe today called a snap election, seeking a fresh term at the helm of the world’s third—largest economy as tensions with nearby North Korea reach fever-pitch.

Abe hopes to capitalise on a weak and fractured opposition to sweep back into power, as polls show him regaining ground after a series of scandals.

“I will dissolve the House of Representatives on the 28th” of September, Abe told reporters, a precursor to a general election. The Prime Minister did not give a date for the election but it will reportedly be on October 22.

Surveys suggest voters approve of the hardline stance taken by the nationalist Abe on North Korea, which fired two missiles over the country in the space of a month and has threatened to “sink” Japan. According to a weekend poll in business daily Nikkei, 44 per cent of voters plan to vote for Abe’s conservative Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), while only eight per cent favoured the main opposition Democratic Party. Nevertheless, one fifth of those polled said they were still undecided, potentially opening the door for gains by a new party formed by allies of the popular mayor of Tokyo Yuriko Koike, which will field dozens of candidates.

Koike’s Tomin First no Kai (Tokyo Residents First) party humiliated Abe and the LDP in local elections in July, but analysts say the new grouping has not had time to lay a national foundation to mount a serious challenge to the Prime Minister.

In an apparent bid to steal Abe’s limelight, Koike went before the cameras just hours before his announcement to announce she was creating a national political party called “Kibo no To” (Party of Hope). “Japan is facing a difficult time considering the situation in North Korea. Economically, the world is making a big move while Japan’s presence is gradually declining,” said Koike, adding, “Can we continue letting (the existing lawmakers) handle politics?”

But Jeff Kingston, director of Asian Studies at Temple University in Japan, said there was “no opposition worthy of the name in Japan“. “The LDP is a giant among dwarves. It would take a major scandal to derail the Abe express,” said the analyst.

The winner of the expected snap election faces a daunting in-tray of challenges ranging from an unprecedented crisis with North Korea to reviving the once world-beating Japanese economy.

In addition to threats to destroy Japan, Pyongyang has fired two missiles over the northern island of Hokkaido in the space of less than a month. However, the North Korea crisis appears to have given the hawkish Abe a welcome boost in the polls following a series of scandals, including allegations he improperly favoured a friend in a business deal.

Despite a recent run of growth, the election winner will also have to contend with a sluggish economy, as the heavily indebted country grapples with a low birth rate and a shrinking labour force.

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Published on September 25, 2017
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