Letters

Tax culture

| Updated on August 14, 2019 Published on August 14, 2019

 

Apropos ‘Tax overreach is becoming the norm’ (August 14). Income tax officials belong to a department people fear. Threats, humiliating comments and prolonged questioning are some of the intimidating tools used to “extract” information and acceptance from the suspects. However, if officials are sensitised with proper training and a reward system to create citizen-friendly culture, revenue collection might increase more. Secondly, since litigation against defaulters results in little success and is time-consuming, an alternative is to simplify the tax law so that an assessee can comprehend it easily.

YG Chouksey

Pune

Market monopoly

This refers to the editorial ‘Broadening the band’ (August 14). If mobile users have changed their usage pattern and the telecom industry has changed their business model from being call- to data-centric, is because of RJio. With deep pockets, the Mukesh Ambani-led RJio has literally made consumers addicted to cheap data. And in the process, it has wiped out the whole competition gradually. Though consumers have no reason to complain, the monopolistic nature of any business is not good for the economy. The First Day First Show will have huge ramifications for cinema industry. The government must wake up and utilise its assets optimally and not allow any private player to have complete monopoly

Bal Govind

Noida

Efficient CBI

With reference to ‘Need to make CBI more independent: CJI Ranjan Gogoi’ August 14), the categorical yet well-meaning remarks of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court stating that the CBI needs to be more independent when investigating high profile cases of graft could not have come at any better time, as the current administrative structure with an overarching executive hampers the agency from doing its job. What else could explain the CJI’s deep concerns with its current operations, more so when he went on to exemplify his sentiments by pointing out various obstructive legal provisions of the Delhi Central Police Establishment Act. However, as is well-known, the denial or delay in various high-profile cases is prompted by some self-serving political considerations rather than any genuine issues.

The CJI also goes on to impress upon the government to take some appropriate steps for reviewing the legislations governing the functioning of the CBI. But, the moot question remains: Will the Opposition political parties take the CJI’s proposed roadmap in the proper perspective or will it simply oppose it.

Vinayak G

Bengaluru

Hindering revival

The scheme to support NBFCs to the tune of ₹1 lakh crore by PSBs will only hamper the turnaround efforts of PSBs. The government has recapitalised PSBs and imposed various conditions on the banks under the PCA. The turnaround efforts are yielding results. The NBFCs have an asset-liability mismatch, which cannot be temporary in nature. The risks will be transferred to PSBs who will be burdened with additional NPAs. The criteria for financing stipulates that NBFCs with less than 6 per cent net NPA and those that have made net profit in at least one of the last two preceding years is a grey area. With no stringent monitoring, NBFCs are likely to have more NPAs than what is shown in their balance sheet. The scheme, while aiming to revive the NBFCs should not deter the efforts of PSBs, which are on revival path.

S Veeraraghavan

MaduraiStart-up structures

This is in reference to the news report ‘Montek :We need an ecosystem for entrepreneurship to flourish’ (August 14) . Prime Minister Modi’s ambitious scheme of ‘Start Up India’ to boost entrepreneurship and create jobs will work wonders if the government gives the required support.

Secondly, there should be a clear demarcation of entrepreneurs based on location. Entrepreneurs who would like to set up their businesses at rural, tribal and backward areas should be given more concessions which will benefit the rural folk.

Veena Shenoy

Thane

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send your letters by email to [email protected] or by post to ‘Letters to the Editor’, The Hindu Business Line, Kasturi Buildings, 859-860, Anna Salai, Chennai 600002.

Published on August 14, 2019
  1. Comments will be moderated by The Hindu Business Line editorial team.
  2. Comments that are abusive, personal, incendiary or irrelevant cannot be published.
  3. Please write complete sentences. Do not type comments in all capital letters, or in all lower case letters, or using abbreviated text. (example: u cannot substitute for you, d is not 'the', n is not 'and').
  4. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.
  5. Please use a genuine email ID and provide your name, to avoid rejection.