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| Updated on March 26, 2020 Published on March 26, 2020

Lockdown impact

This refers to the editorial ‘One-sided response’ (March 26). The sudden announcement of a nationwide lockdown sans effective and requisite measures in place is akin to putting cart before the horse. The relatively better-off are making a beeline for buying essential items and the impoverished and marginalised are left high and dry. Migrant labourers are heading towards villages on foot, and small shopkeepers/vendors are compelled to shutdown and are predictably unable to make both ends meet. Immediate economic measures are needed to prevent the the situation from exacerbating. It may so happen that patience may start wearing thin and famine-like conditions may arise, thus defeating the entire purpose of the lockdown. There is also apprehension that the lockdown could be further extended.

As the saying goes, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Majority of the people are ready to extend unquestioned support to the government for the measures it is taking to contain Covid-19, and all they are asking for is no disruption in supplies of daily provisions and consumables. Further, macro-level steps to stop the economy bleeding may mitigate some pessimism and chaos.

Deepak Singhal

Chennai

Govt support needed

Indeed, the deadly virus has caused the economic cycle of earning and spending to come to a grinding halt. Financial assistance and free ration are a must for the underprivileged who have lost their jobs, so that they are not deprived of the basic necessities of food and medicines. The government must announce more economic stimulus measures for industry during the lockdown. The focus should be more on MSMEs, most of whom are cash-strapped, than on big corporates who can manage the lockdown better.

NR Nagarajan

Sivakasi

Job losses

The 21-day lockdown to counter the pandemic comes with the crippling effect of thousands of people losing their jobs. Daily wage earners and those driving autos and taxis have to stay at home and they will find it hard to make ends meet. The larger economy will also take a big hit.

Jubel D'Cruz

Mumbai

Social responsibility

The nationwide lockdown for 21 days in the backdrop of the scourge of Covid-19 spreading rapidly must succeed for our own sake and we must all cooperate, bearing in mind the risk aggravated by population density and poverty, and abide by the rules laid down by the government for its implementation.

The country’s impoverished cannot survive the three-week-long lockdown without succour from the government. The government must fulfil its ‘social responsibility’ of feeding the manually labouring people; it must ensure that no one goes hungry or dies of hunger. It must distribute free rations and establish and run ‘community kitchens’ and provide some cash relief as life-savers.

G David Milton

Maruthancode, TN

Family bonding

The outbreak of coronavirus has impacted the common man’s daily activities even as the economy is threatening to slip into a recession. Amidst the lockdown call given by the government to strictly stay indoors and stay calm, this is an opportunity to bond with family members and cherish the value of relationships. It is now the duty and responsibility of every family member not to step out and respect the restrictions laid down by the government to prevent further spread of the pandemic.

Varun Dambal

Bengaluru

Hantavirus isn’t a threat

Amidst the coronavirus pandemic, a man in China’s Yunnan has died of hantavirus. However, there’s no need for panic as this virus does not spread through human contact. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has clearly stated that this virus can be contracted only through certain species of rats. So this disease cannot spread rapidly and people need not fear.

Asim Suhail

Mumbai

Published on March 26, 2020
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