Letters

Letters to the editor dated July 27, 2020

| Updated on July 27, 2020 Published on July 27, 2020

Inclusive healthcare

This is with reference to ‘Harness digital tech for inclusive healthcare’ (July 27). Despite its vast potential in terms of youth and brain power, India has not contributed much in the area of medical science. Our healthcare system, government hospitals and medical education require a thorough overhaul. Research and innovative ideas should be encouraged even at the MBBS level. Lack of government support has been a stumbling block to improving the quality of medical education. The Centre should consider setting up a new body to promote innovation/research in the medical field.

Veena Shenoy

Thane

 

Rural education

This refers to ‘New school of thought for rural education’ (July 25). Rural educational institutions, particularly those owned and controlled by the government, lack basic infrastructure facilities such as classrooms with proper sitting arrangements, labs, hygienic toilets, qualified teachers, playgrounds, drinking water, and power supply. Despite education being a part of the social sector, it is not getting adequate investment to help impart quality primary education to the children residing in villages. The government and the private sector must step forward to invest more in the education sector.

VSK Pillai

Kottayam

Autonomy for banks

The RBI and the commercial banks under it must be made independent. They need to be granted total autonomy if the menace of non-performing assets (NPAs) is to be rooted out. The RBI must enjoy as much independence as the judiciary does. Interference by the government and politicians holding high positions is one of the main reasons for NPA generation. If adequate collateral security is obtained before lending, NPAs will not arise at all. Banks must be allowed to take lending decision based on merit and the prescribed norms.

KV Seetharamaiah

Hassan, Karnataka

Form of government

Both the presidential and parliamentary systems of democracy have their pros and cons (‘The presidential model’, July 27). As the president is directly elected by the people, it is usually a charismatic and strong candidate that gets appointed to the office. With the legislature being independent of the executive, checks and balances are ensured. A prime minister, on the other hand, may lose power any time, especially in a coalition government. However, with the executive being a part of the legislative wing, laws get passed faster, with an independent judiciary acting as a watchdog. Though Congress MP Shashi Tharoor advocates a presidential system for India, he also adds that it ‘can easily morph into dictatorship’. But such a possibility exists in the parliamentary system, too. Who can forget the dark chapter of Emergency in India. Ultimately, whatever be the system of government, it is for the people to exercise their power of vote judiciously.

V Jayaraman

Bengaluru

Environmental clearance

This refers to ‘EIA notification will promote land grab, warns Jairam Ramesh’ (July 25). The notification was first issued in 2006 and subsequently tweaked many times to make it more stringent. Many projects could not kick off for want of EC (environmental clearance). The extant EC notification is difficult to comprehend and much is left to the whims and fancies of the approving committee. There are allegations that companies that enjoy political patronage get speedy approvals. Time is ripe to disband the EC body, and leave it to the Central/State pollution boards to issue the requisite NOC.

Deepak Singhal

Chennai

 

Post-harvest storage

‘Kharif crop sowing touches 800 lh’ (July 25), is a direct indication that the farm sector is performing much better than many other sectors amidst the pandemic. However, there needs to be greater emphasis transport and storage of the farm produce post-harvest. India’s major challenge is not in production, but in scientific storage of farm produce.

Rajiv N Magal

Halekere Village, Karnataka

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send your letters by email to bleditor@thehindu.co.in or by post to ‘Letters to the Editor’, The Hindu Business Line, Kasturi Buildings, 859-860, Anna Salai, Chennai 600002.

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Published on July 27, 2020
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