Agri Business

Medicinal traits found in ‘Khapli' wheat

Anil Urs Dharwad | Updated on March 12, 2018 Published on February 23, 2011

Lady farm workers engaged in their works at a wheat cultivating field in Rajasthan (file photo): K K Mustafah   -  Business Line

Emmer wheat, commonly known as “Khapli,” is found to have curative properties for treating diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Its capacity to lower blood glucose and lipid levels and high temperature stress tolerance compared to other cultivated species makes it therapeutic.

According to Dr R R Hanchinal, Vice-Chancellor, University of Agricultural Sciences-Dharwad, looking at the importance of this species, the university has initiated a programme in development of newer semi-dwarf, management responsive varieties in the background of local species (quality attributes).

“These new species besides possessing high yield potential of 42 to 45 quintals per hectare also possess resistance to biotic and abiotic abiotec stresses. As a result of systematic research effort, the world's first semi-dwarf dicoccum variety – DDK-1001 was released induring 1996. The other varieties released by the university include DDK-1009, DDK-1025 and DDK -1029,” he added.

Emmer wheat is grown in an area of 0.2 million hectare with an approximate production of 0.5 million tonnes and is traditionally cultivated in Karnataka, southern Maharashtra, Sourashtra region of coastal Gujarat, parts of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.

Emmer wheat, due to hard and vitreous nature of its grains, milling quality is very superior especially for semolina preparation. Semolina of dicoccum wheat needs less cooking time and has more cooking tolerance.

“Products of this variety are softer, tasty, and have high satiety value. These nutritional and functional qualities make emmer wheat more suitable than durum wheat for the manufacture of dense foods and other local semolina products and are also more suitable as therapeutic food,” explained Dr Hanchinal.

Published on February 23, 2011
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