Money & Banking

DBS India to offer part-time work option for staff

Beena Parmar Mumbai | Updated on February 10, 2015 Published on February 10, 2015

As the foreign bank goes local, it plans to set up training academy



Foreign lender DBS Bank (India) is planning to start a part-time work facility to make the bank an easier workplace even as it plans to take the subsidiary route for its local operations.

“We will soon be launching part-time working arrangement for our employees across departments. This will allow new employees to work part-time for a year or up to three years. This can be easy especially for women employees or those pursuing higher education. We already have this facility in Singapore,” said Kishore Poduri, Head, Human Resources, DBS Bank (India).

Under the part-time facility, an employee can work either half a day every day or three days a week. The salaries are negotiated accordingly.

The Singapore-based bank has already started the process of setting up a wholly-owned subsidiary, whereby it will be treated like a domestic bank and not face hurdles in branch expansion.

Hiring plans

“Under the current business plan, we will increase the intake of fresh talent to the extent of 10 per cent annually, similar to the last two-three years … On an average, we now hire 20-25 people a month, which include replacements,” Poduri said. The bank hires from B-schools.

“For mid-level managers, we extensively use LinkedIn or job portals for our recruitments. Almost 40 per cent of our recruitments are done through industry referrals,” he added. In India, the bank will broad-base its hiring with more local people with necessary skills from in and around the nearest big city.

At present, DBS India has a department that provides on-the-job training, including induction programme. In addition, it is looking at setting up a training academy. At various points in time, DBS has tied up with institutions such as the IIBF (Indian Institute of Banking and Finance) and Dun & Bradstreet to conduct certification programmes.

Published on February 10, 2015
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