Letters

Letters to the editor dated October 30, 2019

| Updated on October 30, 2019 Published on October 30, 2019

New sand policy

This refers to ‘AP sand scarcity leaves lakhs jobless’ (October 30). The construction and real estate sectors have a multiplier effect, hence the number of adversely impacted workers would be far more than the 30 lakh mentioned in the article. Construction activities not only boost economic growth but employment as well. A sand-deficit State cannot afford to delay implementation of a new sand policy. The Jaganmohan Reddy government may have wanted to correct the past wrongs, but delay in new policy roll-out and lack of clarity will hinder whatever good that could be achieved. The sooner the government acts on this crisis, better for the workers .

Bal Govind

Noida

Cryptocurrency regulation

The virtual currency market remains highly volatile, as international acceptance of Altcoins is speculative, even though experienced traders and strategic-analysts predict a huge demand on account of lowering supply/mining-returns and owners promise compliance to regulations in the near future. Excessive selling pressure and bearish investor sentiment persist even as attempts are being made to curb the mushrooming of exchanges and trading in the asset.

The potential cons of terror funding, round-tripping, money laundering, information security breach and non-compliance to tax norms outweigh the benefits of ease of use, cost savings and financial inclusion. Of late, global concerns indicate a rising need to address the wide array of legal/regulatory challenges clouding virtual-currencies. At present, limited availability of secure, advanced networks and infrastructure impedes the application of digital currencies as a viable alternative for peer-to-peer payments and fund transfers. To attain monetary stability and hedge risks arising from Ponzi schemes, it is important to expedite the launch of an alternative crypto-format which is transparent and adherent to global financial standards.

Girish Lalwani

Delhi

Kashmir visit

The criticism emanating from the Opposition parties over the visit of 23 members of the European Parliament to Jammu and Kashmir is not without reason. Barring a few leaders, no Opposition MPs have been allowed to visit the Valley since August 5 when curbs and restrictions on communication and mobility of people were put in place. .

The perception that the European MPs were allowed to visit Kashmir while India’s own MPs were denied the same is nothing but an affront to Parliament and its sovereignty cannot be faulted.

It is time the BJP government lifted restrictions of several hues imposed on the people of Kashmir and restored fundamental rights guaranteed by the Constitution. The failure of the Modi-led dispensation to address the growing apprehensions over human rights violations would only erode the support it enjoys over the decision to abrogate of Article 370.

M Jeyaram

Sholavandan, TN

Drawing parallels

News of the fatal shooting of five Bengali construction workers in Kashmir’s Kulgam district brought back memories of the incidents in Chittisinghpora and Patribal about 20 years ago. The latter incidents (on March 25, 2000) occurred a day before the arrival of the then US President Bill Clinton. At that time, 35 Sikhs were rousted out of their homes in Chittisinghpora and shot. A couple of days later, soldiers of the Indian Army killed five Kashmiri men in an encounter near Patribal, claiming they were responsible for the Chittisinghpora massacre. The confusion over the identity of the five men provoked widespread protests in Kashmir. Crowds were fired upon at many places and many died.

The soldiers involved in the encounter were identified, indicted for murder in a CBI investigation and 14 years later let off by the Army. The matter is pending before the Supreme Court to this day.

Recalling Chittisinghpora leads us to wonder if there is a story behind the deaths of the Bengali construction workers.

Inderjit Singh Jaijee

Chandigarh

Published on October 30, 2019
  1. Comments will be moderated by The Hindu Business Line editorial team.
  2. Comments that are abusive, personal, incendiary or irrelevant cannot be published.
  3. Please write complete sentences. Do not type comments in all capital letters, or in all lower case letters, or using abbreviated text. (example: u cannot substitute for you, d is not 'the', n is not 'and').
  4. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.
  5. Please use a genuine email ID and provide your name, to avoid rejection.