Agri Business

Inauspicious period makes cut flowers lose fragrance

Anil Urs Bangalore | Updated on October 12, 2012 Published on October 12, 2012


Cut flowers prices have crashed by 50 per cent in Bangalore due to pithru paksha (inauspicious period) and entry of new small growers. “Flower prices have dipped sharply for the last two-three weeks on account of pithru paksha - inauspicious period - to conduct any Hindu ceremonies,” said Jayaprakash Rao, General Secretary, South India Floriculture Association.

Normally, flower prices at the International Flower Auction Bangalore (IFAB) trade around Rs 2.50-3 a stem. But due to inauspicious period, prices have come down and are trading at Rs 1.30-1.50. Flower prices were impacted similarly during the inauspicious June-July period, but then they ruled between Rs 2 and Rs 2.50 a stem. Cut flower demand from others cities such as Hyderabad, Chennai and Coimbatore is also low due to same reason of inauspicious month.

Growers are waiting for post-November period for regular sales to pick up. After November, growers get clear five months of continuous sales including lucrative Valentine Day sales. “This year with rain at regular interval backed with adequate sun light has led to good production. Arrivals at the auction platform stood around 8-10 lakh stems against the normal output of around 6-8 lakh,” said Rao. The State Horticulture Department said flower-growing regions of Doddaballapur and Hosur area near Bangalore have got adequate rain since August-September. .

New growers

In addition to low prices/sales due to inauspicious period, the market has also been impacted by entry of new small farms/growers. Lured by subsidy to growers under the National Horticulture Mission (NHM) and the National Horticulture Board (NHB), many growers have mushroomed in and around Bangalore. Without quantifying the number of new growers, Rao said: “The market is witnessing about 10-15 per cent additional flowers entering the market.”

> anil.u@thehindu.co.in

Published on October 12, 2012
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