World

Covid-19 deaths in US crosses World War-I death toll: Report

Prashasti Awasthi Mumbai | Updated on June 17, 2020 Published on June 17, 2020

As the United States has reported 1,19,132 deaths with an addition of 740 deaths registered in 24 hours, its death toll crosses the number of people who died during World War I, as per John Hopkins University report.

The sudden rise came after two days of death tolls under 400. The US also added 23,351 new cases in its tally in the 24-hour period. This brought the total US count up to 2,134,973, making it by far the hardest-hit of any country in the world.

The country witnessed the coronavirus death tally surpassing the number of its soldiers who had died in the Vietnam War in April.

The United States, which is the worst-affected country by the pandemic, has lifted restrictions and is unlocking the economy even when it continues to register around 20,000 new cases of the coronavirus every day, AFP report added.

Several states are even recording their highest levels of new cases since the start of the pandemic.

The US, which is severely hit by the pandemic and is witnessing protests across the country over a black man killing, is going for the 2020 Presidential election this November. President Donald Trump, a Republican party candidate for the election who has downplayed the risk of the coronavirus, has been criticized by experts and media for his ill-management of the crisis.

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell meanwhile warned that the US economy is unlikely to recover as long as "significant uncertainty" remains over the course of the pandemic.

Trump has come under scrutiny for an upcoming campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma -- his first since March when the pandemic halted mass gatherings. It is so far planned for an indoor arena that holds about 20,000 people.

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Published on June 17, 2020
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