Letters

Letters to the Editor dated December 20, 2019

| Updated on December 20, 2019 Published on December 20, 2019

Digital markets

This is with reference to ‘Ensuring free and fair digital markets’ (December 20). The unflinching power of the global giants in the digital world is likely to see them dominate the markets through innovative methods directly and via their intermediaries. No doubt, the competition law in the country regulates such abuses of dominant position by market players. However, providing overriding powers to the CCI to detect and penalise such offenders irrespective of the law under which such offence is covered, would be a deterrent and logical solution to curb such abuse.

Sitaram Popuri

Bengaluru

Human resource

This is with reference to the article ‘How to ensure effective labour flexibility’ (December 20). One asset in India that has been shabbily treated by governments/organisations is human asset. An organisation’s success to a large extent is determined by the quality of its people and, hence, the right investment for the well being of the people in terms of education, health and training goes a long way in building a strong organisation and, in turn, a strong nation. People are in fact the biggest asset of any organisation/nation and the most complex asset.

Many an organisation treats their human assets in same manner as they treat other assets. Human assets have to be dealt with a difference and if properly handled, groomed and counselled, they will become an invaluable asset and will boost the other assets of the organisation.

However, it is sad commentary that while trade unions bargain for higher wages and other facilities, they hardly take up the cause of the mental well-being of employees. In India, we lack good counselling systems in various organisations which is also one of the causes for low productivity in India. A happy and satisfied employee is an asset to any organisation. It’s sad that our organisations do not consider it necessary to counsel their staff members, and hence the employees depend only on the unions to redress their problems.

Veena Shenoy

Thane

Worrying setback

The report ‘Women progressively lose the chance to ascend’ (December 20) is revealing. While it is believed that globally women are inching ahead towards assuming apex leadership roles, the reality seems otherwise — even progressive nations like the US and the UK are regressing, and worldwide women are missing the opportunity to occupy top roles.

The causes for this are well-documented — deeply entrenched feelings of male superiority, glass ceiling, and the like. Probably, now the cases of sexual harassment at work even against corporate honchos and the provisions of anti-harassment law in India are creating a male backlash resisting women’s rise at work, thus defeating the objective of the law. The findings mean that women alone have to fight their battle for gender equality and they have to come together for this.

YG Chouksey

Pune

 

Reappointed of judges

The Centre should impose a two-year ban on the reappointment of Supreme Court and High Court judges on retirement, including at the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC), to avoid chances of them handing out pro-government decisions, especially towards the end of their tenure. The NHRC chief, for instance, can be selected from amongst retired Supreme Court judges after two years of their retirement rather than the present system of appointing only a retired Chief Justice of India for the post. This has, at times, caused non-filling of the post for long.

Simultaneously, the Centre should accept the recommendation of the CJI of raising the retirement age of High Court judges to 65 years, from the present 62, and bringing it on a par with that of Supreme Court judges. This will check the tendency amongst some of the High Court judges who lobby to be elevated to the Supreme Court.

Also, all High Court judges should compulsorily be appointed from outside their home-States to check local influences.

Madhu Agrawal

Delhi

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send your letters by email to bleditor@thehindu.co.in or by post to ‘Letters to the Editor’, The Hindu Business Line, Kasturi Buildings, 859-860, Anna Salai, Chennai 600002.

Published on December 20, 2019
This article is closed for comments.
Please Email the Editor