Indian markets ended the session marginally in the green in the absence of directional cues.

The BSE Sensex ended at 20,310.74, up 49.71 points or 0.25 per cent and the NSE Nifty ended at 6,036.30, up 13.9 points or 0.23 per cent.

On the BSE, realty and capital good stocks were hit the most with their sectoral indices down by 1.57 per cent and 0.92 per cent, respectively. FMCG and consumer durables sectors, however, supported the Sensex with their sectoral indices up by 1.36 per cent and 1.00 per cent, respectively.

Coal India, Tata Power, HUL, M&M and Maruti were the top five Sensex gainers, while the top five losers were BHEL, Axis Bank, Cipla, TCS and SBI.

A report by India Forex Advisors said: “Foreign investors sold a net $1.7 billion worth of shares and debt over the previous seven sessions. This is in contrast to the consistency of flows witnessed in the first two months every year. We have to say this because January has been one of the worst months in terms of FII inflows. The sell-offs were primarily triggered by weaker-than-anticipated US data, as well as concerns over growth in China and the outlook for some emerging economies. This is not only the case with India. Other major emerging markets (EM) are also seen undergoing the similar situation. The slowdown in emerging economies and the US central bank's decision to scale back monetary stimulus have many investors worried about the state of the world's economy. Blame game is on in this context. Some are blaming the US Federal Reserve for withdrawing its asset purchase too quickly, while others are holding the EM's responsible saying these markets were unprepared for it. We cannot blame all of it on the Fed' tapering decision, because the EM's have always been suffering from their internal quandaries which are posing a threat to these countries itself.”

European stocks were up as investors awaited the European Central Bank’s rate decision and weighed company earnings. Asian shares ended higher.

(This article was published on February 6, 2014)
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