World

UK Govt needs Parliament approval to trigger EU divorce: High Court

Reuters London | Updated on January 15, 2018 Published on November 03, 2016
Demonstrators stand outside the High Court during a legal challenge to force the British government to seek parliamentary approval before starting the formal process of leaving the European Union, in London, Britain.

Demonstrators stand outside the High Court during a legal challenge to force the British government to seek parliamentary approval before starting the formal process of leaving the European Union, in London, Britain. File Photo   -  Reuters

The government can appeal against the ruling before the Supreme Court, which has set aside Dec. 5-8 to deal with the matter.

England's High Court ruled on Thursday that the British government requires parliamentary approval to trigger the process of exiting the European Union (EU), a major upset for Prime Minister Theresa May's plans for Brexit.

Sterling rose on the news, with many investors taking the view that lawmakers would temper the government's policies and make an economically disruptive “hard Brexit” less likely.

The court said it had granted the government permission to appeal against the ruling before the Supreme Court, which has set aside Dec. 5-8 to deal with the matter.

A panel of three of the most senior judges in the country ruled that the government could not trigger Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty, the formal step needed to start negotiations on the terms of Brexit, without approval from parliament. “The court does not accept the argument put forward by the government,” said Lord Chief Justice John Thomas, reading out the three judges' ruling.

“For the reasons set out in the judgment, we decide that the government does not have power ... to give notice pursuant to Article 50 for the UK to withdraw from the European Union.”

International Trade Secretary Liam Fox said the government was disappointed with the court ruling and would consider it carefully before deciding how to proceed.

“The country voted to leave the European Union in a referendum approved by acts of parliament. The government is determined to respect the result of the referendum,” Fox told parliament

UK government disappointed by court decision

The British government is disappointed with a decision by England's High Court that it requires parliamentary approval to trigger the process of leaving the European Union, trade minister Liam Fox said on Thursday.

“The government is disappointed by the court's judgment. The country voted to leave the European Union in a referendum approved by acts of parliament. The government is determined to respect the result of the referendum,” Fox told parliament.

“This judgment raises important and complex matter of law and it is right that we consider it carefully before deciding how to proceed.”

To appeal court ruling on triggering Brexit

The British government said on Thursday it will appeal a decision by the High Court that requires it to gain parliamentary approval before triggering the process of exiting the European Union.

“The country voted to leave the European Union in a referendum approved by Act of Parliament,” a government spokesman said in a statement.

“The government is determined to respect the result of the referendum. We will appeal this judgment.”

Published on November 03, 2016
This article is closed for comments.
Please Email the Editor