Economy

Japan keen to boost ties with India

Our Bureau New Delhi | Updated on March 12, 2018 Published on June 07, 2011

Mr Shinichi Nishimiya (right), Deputy Minister (Economy), Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan, addressing an interactive meeting on ‘G20, Post Disaster Japan and Japan-India Economic Partnership’, in the Capital. on Tuesday. Also seen is Mr Akitaka Saiki, Ambassador of Japan to India. – Kamal Narang   -  Business Line



Japan is looking to accelerate bilateral trade with India.

The country, which battled one of the worst nuclear disasters earlier this year, said it will also cooperate with India on improving the safety of atomic reactors.

“India is projected ahead of China as a long-term economic prospect, particularly in the area of manufacturing, by the Japanese Bank for International Cooperation,” Mr Shinichi Nishimiya, Deputy Minister (Economy) in the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said at a event.

CEPA boost

He said the signing of the Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) between Japan and India is bound to boost the level of bilateral trade and investment.

The country now looks to the world, especially India, to step up the inflow of business and leisure tourists to Japan and resume buying its quality products.

The trade figures, although far below expectations, are looking up. Two-way trade has grown from $9.3 billion a year earlier to $12.9 billion in 2010.

Allaying concerns over safety, the Japanese Minister said it is quite safe for businessmen and tourists to visit his country, as Japan is free from any radiation threats.

Invite for Bollywood

He also said that Japan will consider incentives to encourage Bollywood film makers to look at the East Asian country as a destination for shooting as a means of attracting tourist inflows from India.

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Published on June 07, 2011
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