Logistics

In a move away from Pratt & Whitney, IndiGo places $20-bn order for CFM engines

Our Bureau New Delhi | Updated on June 17, 2019 Published on June 17, 2019

IndiGo’s latest CFM order includes spare engines as well as an overhaul support agreement   -  REGIS DUVIGNAU

Delhi-based low-cost airline IndiGo has ordered CFM International LEAP 1-A engines to power 280 Airbus A-320 Neo and Airbus A-321 Neo aircraft in its fleet. The $20-billion order at list price means IndiGo is moving away from Pratt & Whitney, whose engines have been facing problems for a while now.

IndiGo had initially ordered Pratt & Whitney engines to power it Neo aircraft in 2012, seeing a market opportunity as Kingfisher Airlines began to run into financial trouble. Kingfisher suspended operations on October 3, 2012.

In March 2018, IndiGo grounded 11 Airbus A-320 Neo while GoAir grounded three such aircraft powered by certain Pratt & Whitney engines following instances of engine failures during flight.

There were also instances of aircraft powered by the company’s engines failing mid-air, and some having to make an emergency landing.

Earlier in the year, the European Aviation Safety Agency had called for the global grounding of Airbus 320 Neo aircraft due to a few occurrences of aborted take-offs and in-flight shutdowns on aircraft fitted with the PW 1100 engines from Serial Number 450 and beyond.

IndiGo’s latest order includes spare engines and an overhaul support agreement. To support its new LEAP-1A fleet, IndiGo has also signed a long-term service agreement with CFM. Delivery of the first LEAP-1A-powered A320 Neo is scheduled for 2020. The airline has been a CFM customer since 2016 and currently operates a fleet of 17 A320 Conventional Engine Option aircraft powered by CFM engines.

“We are pleased to partner with CFM for our next batch of Airbus A320 Neo and A321 Neo aircraft,” said Riyaz Peermohamed, Chief Aircraft Acquisition and Financing Officer of IndiGo.

The LEAP engine has logged nearly 5 million engine flight hours in less than three years of commercial service.

Published on June 17, 2019
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