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Covid19 vaccine: Indian Immunologicals Limited partners with Griffith University

G Naga Sridhar Hyderabad | Updated on April 07, 2020

As part of the agreement, scientists from Indian Immunologicals and Griffith University will develop a ‘Live Attenuated SARS – CoV-2 vaccine’

Vaccine maker Indian Immunologicals Limited (IIL), is going to commence research for developing a vaccine for Corona Virus (COVID-19).

The Hyderabad based IIL joined hands with Griffith University, Australia by entering into an agreement for research collaboration to conduct exploratory research to develop a lead vaccine candidate for Coronavirus.

As part of the agreement, scientists from Indian Immunologicals and Griffith University will develop a ‘Live Attenuated SARS – CoV-2 vaccine’ or Covid-19 vaccine using the latest codon de-optimization technology.

"The technology looks promising for developing a vaccine for prophylactic, active, single dose immunization against coronavirus in humans, with an enhanced safety profile,'' IIL said in a release.

The vaccine is expected to provide long-lasting protection with a single dose administration with an anticipated safety profile similar to other licensed vaccines for active immunization.

Upon completion of the research, the vaccine strain will be transferred to Indian Immunologicals Limited and the vaccine maker will work accordingly with the country’s regulator – CDSCO (The Central Drugs Standard Control Organisation) - to further conduct clinical trials which will be taken up in a phased manner.

"IIL has taken up this initiative to develop a vaccine candidate for the pandemic – COVID-19. IIL’s leadership in producing safe and affordable human and veterinary vaccines will enable us to progress well in this endeavor”, K Anand Kumar, Managing Director, Indian Immunologicals said.

“Our live-attenuated vaccine will be developed using codon de-optimization technology and is expected to provide long lasting immunity against SARS – CoV-2 following a single immunisation and cross-protection against other coronaviruses (e.g. MERS, SARS-CoV-1),'' Suresh Mahalingam, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Australia said.

 

Published on April 07, 2020

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