Science

Novartis CEO says it’ll take more than vaccines to fight Covid-19

Bloomberg September 30 | Updated on September 30, 2020 Published on September 30, 2020

Novartis expects data from a large study showing whether its anti-inflammation drug canakinumab can help patients with severe Covid-19 by the end of October or early November, Novartis AG Chief Executive Officer Vas Narasimhan said   -  REUTERS

Some of the biggest strides against the pandemic have come from the use of drugs such as steroids to help prevent serious damage to the lungs

Vaccines alone won’t be enough to fight Covid-19, Novartis AG Chief Executive Officer Vas Narasimhan said. Treatments will also play a crucial role.

Significant supplies of highly-effective vaccines probably won’t be available until the end of next year, according to Narasimhan, who headed development for Novartis’ former vaccines unit before it was sold to GlaxoSmithKline Plc five years ago.

Even once such a vaccine is on the market, he said, it probably won’t protect everyone — as is the case with seasonal flu.

“At minimum, therapeutics are a bridge to those high-volume, high-efficacy vaccines,” Narasimhan said in an interview. “Likely even beyond the point of vaccines being broadly deployed, we will need therapeutics for those patients who still become ill from the virus.”

Also read: Rethinking Covid-19 testing strategy

Some of the biggest strides against the pandemic so far have come from therapies, with the use of drugs such as steroids to help prevent serious damage to the lungs. The verdict is still out, meanwhile, on the first vaccines. Early data from front-runners will probably come this fall, with Pfizer Inc predicting it will have results as soon as October.

Novartis expects data from a large study showing whether its anti-inflammation drug canakinumab can help patients with severe Covid-19 by the end of October or early November, Narasimhan said. Together with partner Incyte Corp, the company is also studying a blood and bone marrow cancer medicine called ruxolitinib in Covid-19 patients whose immune systems have gone into overdrive and begun to attack their own bodies.

The Swiss pharmaceutical company and 15 other drugmakers issued a joint pledge with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation on Wednesday promising, among other things, to support fair allocation of vaccines and therapies globally. Suppliers will decide on their own whether to use donations, not-for-profit supply or tiered pricing.

Also read: Covid-19: The countries that don’t want to wait for superpowers’ vaccines

They also called for removing unwarranted political considerations from the process to approve drugs, vaccines and tests.

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Published on September 30, 2020
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