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Anand Mahindra supports proposed EU legislation for common charger across all devices

Hemani Sheth Mumbai | Updated on February 12, 2020 Published on February 11, 2020

File photo of Anand Mahindra

Says the ‘breathtakingly simple’ law  will end the need to carry multiple chargers, and also curb e-waste

Mahindra Group Chairman Anand Mahindra has spoken  in favour of the EU’s proposal to pass legislation that mandates smartphone manufacturers to adopt a shared charging cable standard.

 

Responding to a World Economic Forum (WEF) video report shared by Twitter user Erik Solheim (@ErikSolheim), Mahindra said   the issue is  a “big deal” for people who are forced to carry multiple chargers for different devices. He further  said the proposed regulations will curb e-waste generation. 

 

‘A big deal’

“This seems like such a trivial issue but frankly a big deal for those who have to carry multiple chargers if you have more than one device. This is a breathtakingly simple proposal made more urgent due to the sword of electronic waste hanging over us,” Mahindra had tweeted. 

 

According to  the WEF   report, every year, the EU generates 12.3 million tonnes of electronic waste   and multiple chargers could be one of the major problem areas. The European Parliament, in January, had voted in an  overwhelming majority -- 582 to 40 votes – for a resolution to adopt a common charger across all devices. Lawmakers are expected to table the draft legislation by July, Engadget had reported. 

 

The proposal has gained criticism from phone manufacturers including Apple, the Independent reported. 

 

It could add to smartphone manufacturers’ costs, and they would need to re-design the charging system for their respective models.  Some also argue that the move could generate additional e-waste as manufacturers abruptly switch to a common design. It could also harm developing countries as most of the e-waste is sent to them, Reuters reported. 

 

Wireless chargers

European lawmakers have argued that wireless chargers could be a solution, according to the WEF report. This would   make life easier for consumers, it has been argued.

 

This is not the first time the EU has proposed     such legislation to reduce e-waste. 

The European Commission in October 2019 had adopted the Ecodesign Directive that     outlines energy efficiency and  other requirements for appliances such as dishwashers, refrigerators and washing machines. 

 

According to the European Commission’s official press statement, the regulations will not only improve energy efficiency but also save EU homes €150 per year. 

 

“The European Commission estimates that this package of measures will deliver 167 TWh of final energy savings per year by 2030. This is equivalent to the annual energy consumption of Denmark,” the Commission had said in the statement. 

 

Published on February 11, 2020
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