Companies

Fujifilm betting big on high-end digital cameras

Our Bureau Mumbai | Updated on January 09, 2018

Yasunobu Nishiyama, MD, Fujifilm India

Japanese photography and imaging company Fujifilm expects its revenue to increase 10 per cent this year with the launch of new products and widening of market reach.

Despite the slowdown for its conventional products in India, the company has managed to gain market share in the medical business, which is driven by computer radiology and digital radiology products. These digitise x-rays and send them to computers, where they can be stored as images and retrieved later.

Yasunobu Nishiyama, Managing Director, Fujifilm India, said the company is seeing a revival in demand post GST rollout, and the revenue this fiscal should touch ₹1,100 crore, against ₹1,000 crore logged last year.

The company’s manufacturing plant in Pune, Fujifilm Sericol, produces ink for wide format printers and it is exploring possibilities to develop more products through local collaborations.

The company recently launched Uvistar Hybrid 320, a wide format UV production printer to cater to the need of the graphics art market. It is a 3.2 m, combination flatbed and roll printer, capable of producing high quality output at speeds of up to 201 sq m an hour.

On the demand for cameras, Nishiyama said smartphones do pose a huge threat to compact digital cameras in general. However, due to rising consumer awareness, the high-end digital camera market has vast potential in India.

“Technological advancements like mirrorless camera and increased functionalities like GPS, Bluetooth, wi-fi in the cameras are expected to reduce the substitution effect in the coming times. We expect to see the demand for mirrorless camera market to increase gradually and surpass DSLR market by 2019,” he said.

Published on November 16, 2017

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