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1.9 million people die from tobacco-induced heart disease: WHO

Prashasti Awasthi Mumbai | Updated on September 24, 2020 Published on September 24, 2020

Even a few cigarettes a day, occasional smoking, or exposure to second-hand smoke increase the risk of heart disease

The World Health Organization (WHO) revealed on its official release that every year, 1.9 million people die from tobacco-induced heart disease.

The multilateral organisation noted that this equates to one in five of all deaths from heart disease.

WHO urged all tobacco users to quit the consumption of tobacco, stressing that smokers are more likely to experience an acute cardiovascular event at a younger age than non-smokers.

However, if tobacco users take immediate action and quit, then their risk of heart disease will decrease by 50 per cent after one year of not smoking, WHO added.

The health agency also informed that even a few cigarettes a day, occasional smoking, or exposure to second-hand smoke increase the risk of heart disease.

Eduardo Bianco, Chair of the World Heart Federation Tobacco Expert Group, said in the official release: “Given the current level of evidence on tobacco and cardiovascular health and the health benefits of quitting smoking, failing to offer cessation services to patients with heart disease could be considered clinical malpractice or negligence.

He added: “Cardiology societies should train their members in smoking cessation, as well as to promote and even drive tobacco control advocacy efforts.”

Also read: Smokers resort to vaping to quit smoking: Study

The brief also revealed that smokeless tobacco is responsible for around 200,000 deaths from coronary heart disease per year. E-cigarettes also raise blood pressure and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

WHO stated that tobacco control is a key element for reducing heart disease. Governments can help tobacco users quit by increasing tax on tobacco products, enforcing bans on tobacco advertising, and offering services to help people give up tobacco.

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Published on September 24, 2020
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